How to handle a massive info dump post-ending?

Asked by: Emily Wood

How do you deal with information dumping?


And reactions that you're getting and just brainstorm ways to have your character react to things essentially.

How do you know if you’re Infodumping?

So how do you know if you’ve got an info dump on your hands? Info dumps can be fairly easily identified because nothing within the info dump is happening in the moment of the scene. Often they are reflections on the past (back story) or convey facts about the characters or world.

What is considered info dumping?

Info dumping is what happens when the author gives the reader a massive amount of background information in a matter of pages instead of letting the story unfold.

How do you weave exposition into your story?

Here are tips on how to weave exposition naturally into the story.

  1. Avoid infodumps. Everyone knows that infodumps are often boring and stilted. …
  2. Trust your readers to go with the flow. …
  3. It’s okay to just tell the reader what they need to know. …
  4. Transform exposition into a quest for information.


What does dumping mean in business?

Dumping is, in general, a situation of international price discrimination, where the price of a product when sold in the importing country is less than the price of that product in the market of the exporting country. Thus, in the simplest of cases, one identifies dumping simply by comparing prices in two markets.

What should you avoid to include in your expositions?

So don't give them everything right at the beginning give them enough information for what is happening to be understandable. And no more than that outlining.

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How do you get Worldbuild a story?

8 Tips to Guide Your Worldbuilding Process

  1. Decide where to start. …
  2. List the rules and laws. …
  3. Establish the type of world you want. …
  4. Describe the environment. …
  5. Define the culture. …
  6. Define the language. …
  7. Identify the history. …
  8. Use existing works to inspire.